All For One

You are the salt of the earth. But if salt loses it’s taste, with what can it be seasoned? It is no longer good for anything but to be thrown out and trampled underfoot. You are the light of the world. A city set on a mountain cannot be hidden. Nor do they light a lam and then put it under a bushel basket; it is set on a lampstand, where it gives light to all in the house. Just so, your light must shine before others, that they may see your good deeds and glorify your heavenly Father. (Mt. 5: 13-16)

Fr. Albert Bischoff, S. J.

“All for One.” It’s the motto of a lovely little Jesuit University of which I’ve grown fond. The Xavier University class of 2020 will include none other than my oldest son, Nicholas Thieme. Nick Fred started his journey at X thinking he wanted to be an athletic trainer. He loves helping people, and he’s passionate about sports, so this choice made sense to me. Then, he discovered there’s a dreadful need to master the biological sciences inherent in this course of study. Nick’s more of a math guy, which is why our finance major excelled once he realized the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree, ha? I’m entirely biased, of course, but the folks at Fifth Third Bank are gaining a fine human being among their ranks this summer.

The relatively small campus of Xavier University, located in the middle of Cincy, reminds me a lot of Butler here in Indianapolis. Folks at X might be even crazier about hoops than Bulldog fans, actually! One big difference I’d note, however, is the very prominent placement of the Bellarmine Chapel right in the center of campus. It’s a Jesuit University, and one of the “institutions” on campus is also the presence of Fr. Albert Bischoff. Fr. B turned 90 a year or two ago, I believe? I’m not certain of his age, to be honest, but this week he celebrated another birthday so he’s been on my mind. I met him briefly only once, but it made an impact. He’s most notable to me and many for the way he greets students, by calling them “Saint”.

Yesterday, while I attended a weekly prayer meeting for women called “Awaken” at St. Elizabeth Seton parish here in Carmel, I closed the meeting for my group with a prayer that was largely inspired by the words of Fr. B. .

“I’ve come to believe in the essential goodness of people, and so one day it just came out ‘saint’ and I thought, ‘oh, that’s good’ because that is what we are. We are God’s holy people. And we tend to be negative about ourselves. We overlook our own holiness. I am very grateful to be here and share my life with these people, who I have found to be overwhelmingly good. I want to be with the saints.”

The ladies at my table were a little stopped in their tracks by the beauty of Fr. B’s sentiments, which I uttered rather inarticulately. The Lord found His way to shine in them all the same, as He tends to do– which brings me to my day this morning.

After mass, I met a dear friend for breakfast to celebrate her birthday. If her life story was made into a movie, it would blow your mind. Anyway, she’s well aware of my Jesus girl “isms” and sometimes she quizzes me a bit about Catholic things. Most recently, her interest has been about the concept of adoration, and also the Blessed Virgin. I’d like to say I’ve helped her understand my deep love for both, but that’s not really accurate. I’m leery of effusing much, though I’m bursting to do just that. Part of my problem is that I don’t really want to call attention to myself or my faith. It can be uncomfortable to stand out, or to feel like I am claiming to be something more than what I am. My personal faults and failures are always front and center.

In other words, I find myself identifying with Fr. B. His words resonate as truth. The number of phenomenal, character and faith-filled friends I have who similarly feel like they are not enough, or who speak negatively about themselves (whether interiorly or exteriorly) is astounding. We overlook our own holiness. The thing is, we’ve got to be brave!! This line of thinking is shortsighted and limiting. We’re called to more.

Here’s today’s big idea. I’ve seen how you folks notice the good things others do and that you are quick with compliments and thank yous. I spent a year picking out someone to do this with every day– and you people joined in whole-heartedly with your words of affirmation for the folks around you. It’s not braggadocios to love the Lord and let our light shine. It’s an act of humility to accept that you are good at some things too.

Let’s be open to the big plans God has for us, forsaking the inner critic. My plan is to work hard and not let myself be derailed– by my own criticism or that of others.

I wasn’t sure how my Methodist breakfast buddy would feel about receiving a rosary from me for her birthday, but I figured maybe the solution to her queries about Mary was just to give her a rosary and let Mary work it out with her directly? I told her to put it in her pocket and when she’s feeling anxious and blue, rub her fingers through the beads and that will help her remember she’s not alone and that our Heavenly Mother is there for her always.

Her eyes filled with tears and her face lit up.

“You’re going to turn me Catholic, aren’t you?”

I laughed and said, “Well, I love you, so yes, I hope so.”

She smiled and as we were preparing to part she quietly said, “Thank you. You turned the lights back on.”

AND…Mary swoops in with the victory! Nothing feels better than cooperating in that. Am I right?

Don’t hide your light. #All for One!!

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